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Posts for tag: dry mouth

By Ajax Dental Center
April 05, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   dry mouth  
DryMouthFAQs

Dry mouth is a condition that many of us have experienced at some point in life. However, for some people it is a problem that can wreak havoc on their lives. This is why we have put together this list of questions we are most frequently asked about dry mouth.

What is dry mouth?
The medical term for dry mouth is “xerostomia” (“xero” – dry; “stomia” – mouth) and it affects millions of people in the US alone. It is caused by an insufficient flow of saliva, the liquid produced by the salivary glands. These glands are located in the inside cheeks of the mouth by the back top molars and in the floor (under the tongue) of the mouth. When functioning properly, they produce two to four pints of liquid every 24 hours.

Can drugs contribute to dry mouth?
Yes, both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs can cause dry mouth. This is one reason we so often find it in senior citizens, as they are typically on more medications than younger, healthier people.

What about diseases...can they cause dry mouth?
Certain systemic (general body) and autoimmune (“auto” – self; “immune” – resistance system) diseases, in which the body reacts against its own tissue, can cause dry mouth. Other diseases that can be the culprit include: diabetes, Parkinson's disease, cystic fibrosis, and AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). Radiation and chemotherapy used to treat head and neck cancers can inflame, damage or destroy the salivary glands—thus causing dry mouth.

Are there any remedies for dry mouth?
Yes! If medication is the primary cause of your dry mouth, there may be other, similar drugs that can be substituted that do not produce the same side effect. If you feel this describes your situation, discuss your concerns with the prescribing physician. Another option is taking an OTC or prescription saliva stimulant to temporarily relieve the dryness. Or, you can suck on a candy made with xylitol, a natural sugar substitute, four to five times a day. Xylitol has been shown to help stimulate the production of saliva with the added benefit of reducing the odds of getting cavities.

To learn more on this subject, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dry Mouth.” You can also contact us today with any questions or to schedule an appointment.

By Ajax Dental Center
June 22, 2012
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   dry mouth  
UnderstandingDryMouth

The medical term for dry mouth is xerostomia (“xero” – dry; “stomia” – mouth), something that many of us have experienced at some point in life. However, for some people it can be a chronic condition that is ideal for promoting tooth decay. It can also be a warning sign of a more serious health condition.

Dry mouth occurs when there is an insufficient flow of saliva, the fluid secreted by the salivary glands. Your major salivary glands are located in two places: inside the checks by the back top molars and in the floor of the mouth, with about six hundred tiny glands scattered throughout your mouth. And many people are surprised to learn that when they are functioning normally, saliva glands secret between two and four pints of saliva per day! While this may sound like a lot (and it is), saliva is key for buffering or neutralizing acids in the mouth. Without this powerful protection, tooth decay can increase quickly. This is especially true for older individuals who have exposed tooth root surfaces.

It is also important to note that there are times when mouth dryness is perfectly normal. For example, when you wake, you will probably have a slightly dry mouth because saliva flow slows at night. Another example is if you are dehydrated when it is simply a warning sign that you need to drink more fluids (especially water). Other causes for temporary dry mouth include stress as well as what you consume: coffee, alcohol, onions, and certain spices.

You can also have a dry mouth due to a side effect from an over-the-counter (OTC) or prescription medication. If it turns out that this is the cause in your case, you need to talk to the prescribing physician to see if there is something else you can take to avoid this side effect. If there are no substitutes, one tip you can try is to take several sips of water before taking the medication followed by a full glass of water, or chew gum containing xylitol, which moistens your mouth and decreases the risk of tooth decay.

Another cause of dry mouth is radiation treatment for cancer in the head and neck region. Yes, these treatments are crucial for fighting cancer; however, they can inflame, damage or destroy salivary glands. You can also have dry mouth from certain systemic (general body) or autoimmune (“auto” – self; “immune” – resistance system) diseases, diabetes, Parkinson's disease, cystic fibrosis and AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome).

To learn more, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dry Mouth.” Or, you can contact us today to ask your questions, discuss your circumstances or schedule an appointment.